Development of a new, highly selective tight-junction-targeting antibody for the treatment of ovarian cancer

Development of a new, highly selective tight-junction-targeting antibody for the treatment of ovarian cancer

In addition to surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies have become firmly established as a fourth pillar in the multimodal treatment of various malignant diseases. To exploit the full therapeutic potential of monoclonal antibodies, the target structure should allow a clear discrimination between tumor cells and healthy cells. So an ideal antigen for therapeutic antibodies with high potency and lack of toxicity should be selectively expressed on tumor cells and should not be detectable in all normal tissues.

We have developed an ideal monoclonal antibody (IMAB) which is directed against a target that is found exclusively in ovarian carcinomas and not in normal healthy tissues. Ovarian cancer currently accounts for about 5% of all malignancies in women and continues to be a disease with a high unmet medical need. Ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cancer and the world's seventh most common cause of cancer death in women, in the G7 countries it is even the fifth most common. Globally, an estimated 225,500 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer every year, and about 140,200 die from the disease. The incidence of ovarian cancer increases with age and the median age at diagnosis is 60 years.

The aim of the project within the Ci3 cluster is to further develop IMAB through to clinical testing for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

Keywords 

  • Monoclonal antibodies
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Tumor-specific antigen

Image